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Bumps in the Road to Wig Love

28 Jan, 2016

Bumps in the Road to Wig Love

Even with all of the good advice, careful preparation, and prayers (!!!), there can be bumps in the road with even the best of wigs. I run a wig resale shop, so I hear it all. Here are three of the most common scenarios my customers share with me:

1. There's clumping and matting in my wig. It’s so bad I can't brush it out!

This is usually a defect of the wig. Most likely, the hair has been accidentally sewn in so that the hair's cuticles are not all running in the same direction. Cuticles are like little hooks and they catch on each other, creating matting.

Don't keep brushing the hair and trying to untangle it. You'll pull out hair and damage the wig. Any reputable and skilled wig maker can take care of this. She will treat or replace the matting hair and your wig will be just fine.

2. My wig doesn’t fit well!

Proper fit is key to a wig's comfort and appearance. To ensure a good fit, wear the wig for a couple of hours before you commit to buy it. But sometimes, you fall in love with a wig that’s not a perfect fit.

The good news is that this is generally pretty easy to get around. Find yourself a wig maker or seamstress who is skilled in cap alterations. I suggest asking if what you want is doable and what kind of guarantee is provided on the alterations.

A good rule of thumb is that a wig can usually be taken up or down one size. So don't buy a size extra large with the intention of altering it to a size small.

3. I’m not loving the cut!

This happens. Maybe the stylist wasn't as expert as you'd hoped; or you were not clear about what you wanted or she misunderstood; or you had a cut in mind you thought you would like, but now you're not so sure; or you let the stylist choose and were not happy with the results.

This is a tough one. First, try wearing the wig for a couple of weeks as it is. See if it's something you really dislike, or if it's just something new that you need to get used to.

It's happened to me more than I'd like to admit, and to be honest, I don't think it was anyone's fault. Once (before I became a wig insider), I bought a cheap wig on sale and took it to a great stylist for a cut. The wig cost about $400 and the cut $300!

I wanted the cheapy to look like a high­-end wig once it was cut—sleek, flat on top, not too much body. I didn't say that to her, I just assumed she would make it look great. But lo and behold, it was a good cut, but just way too much body for me.

Eventually I had her cut it down to a chic bob so that the heaviness at the top wasn't so obvious. I came to love that wig, but I learned my lesson. You have to make sure that what you want is even achievable with the piece you have.

You may just need a recut. Almost all wig stylist allow you to come back and tweak the cut, either a specific number of times or within a time frame.

If you think that the cut was botched, this is a much thornier issue because whether a cut is good or not is so subjective.

The wig stylist may feel that she did the job she was asked to do, while you may feel the opposite. Very rarely is it a clear case of wrong and right because what looks good is a matter of opinion.

There are a quite a few options here: you can have her try to remedy the cut, take it elsewhere for a recut, add hair to make it longer if it was cut too short, have bangs replaced, etc. You can end up please or not.

At some point, you just have to stop putting time and money (and worry) into the wig and accept that it's time to move on. And please read my tips for getting the cut you want for your next wig.

 

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